Plenary Speakers

Ignacio E. Grossmann

Name and Title

Ignacio E. Grossmann,
Professor

Affiliation

Center for Advanced Process Decision-making, Carnegie Mellon University

Lecture Title

Optimal Synthesis and Planning of Sustainable Chemical Processes and Energy Systems

Lecture Abstract

Sustainability has emerged as a key issue in process systems engineering (PSE). Mathematical programming techniques such as mixed-integer programming and global optimization offer a general modeling framework for including environmental concerns in the synthesis and planning of chemical processes and energy systems.

One major critical issue is how to systematize the search for alternatives leading to reductions in environmental impact. Furthermore, aside from anticipating the effect of uncertainties, which are quite pronounced in this area, there is the issue on how to cope with competing economic and environmental objectives. In the area of process synthesis we address the energy and water optimization of biofuel plants.

We present an optimization framework based on superstructure optimization that effectively accounts for energy and water integration, and illustrate its application to the optimization of bioethanol plants. In the area of supply chain optimization we consider first the design of an integrated supply chain for gasoline and ethanol that can deliver a variety of blends.

We also consider the optimal design of centralized and distributed manufacturing facilities for the production of bioethanol. We next address the design of shale gas infrastructures and the associated scheduling of fracturing wells and impaired water management to reduce the consumption of water.

The next major problem we consider is the long-term planning of electric power infrastructures involving coal, natural gas and nuclear power with high renewable penetration (wind, solar) . To capture the intermittency of these sources, we propose a deterministic multi-scale MILP formulation that simultaneously considers annual generation investment decisions and hourly operational decisions. To overcome the computational challenges of treating hourly operational decisions within a monolithic multi-year planning horizon, we propose a decomposition algorithm, which can be extended to the case of uncertainty in power demands.

Finally, we consider the environmentally conscious design and planning of hydrogen supply chains for vehicle use using a multiobjective optimization approach coupled with the Eco-indicator 99 to assess the effect on human health.

Short Bio of the Lecturer

Ignacio E. Grossmann (B.S. Universidad Iberoamericana; M.S., Ph.D. Imperial College) is the R. R. Dean University Professor of Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon, and director of the "Center for Advanced Process Decision-making."

A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has received many awards from AIChE and INFORMS, including the Sargent Medal by the Institution of Chemical Engineers in 2015, and the distinction of being named “One of the Hundred Chemical Engineers of the Modern Era” by AIChE in 2008.

He has honorary doctorates from the Technical University of Dortmund, Abo Akademi, University of Maribor, University of Cantabria, Russian Kazan Technological University, University Nacional del Litoral and the University of Alicante.

His research interests are in mixed-integer, disjunctive and stochastic programming, energy systems, water networks, and planning and scheduling for enterprise-wide optimization. He has authored over 700 papers and supervised 62 Ph.D. and 16 M.S. students.

Santanu Bandyopadhyay

Name and Title

Santanu Bandyopadhyay,
Professor

Affiliation

Department of Energy Science and Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Bombay

Lecture Title

Incorporating Uncertainties in Pinch Analysis

Lecture Abstract

Pinch Analysis is an important technique to achieve sustainable development through conserving resources in source-sink resource conservation networks.

Diverse applications and methodologies of Pinch Analysis primarily consider only exact and precise parameters. Parametric uncertainties in source-sink networks arise due to changes in operating and environmental conditions, along with the lack of a complete understanding of the processes involved.

This talk reviews recent developments in Pinch Analysis to account for parametric variabilities and uncertainties in resource conservation networks.

Short Bio of the Lecturer

Santanu Bandyopadhyay is a Professor, Department of Energy Science and Engineering, at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay.

He has been associated with and contributed towards various developmental, industrial, and research activities involving different structured approaches to process synthesis, energy integration and conservation, and renewable energy systems design.

He is currently one of the Editors-in-Chief for Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability (Springer Nature) as well as Associate Editor for Journal of Cleaner Production (Elsevier), Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy (Springer Nature), etc.

Prof. Bandyopadhyay is a fellow of Indian National Association of Engineering (INAE).

Guest Speakers of Honour

Donald Huisingh

Name and Title

Donald Huisingh,
Professor, Emeritus

Affiliation

Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. U.S.A.

Lecture Title

"Don’t Waste a Good Crisis?"

Lecture Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic caught educators, industrialists, governmental leaders and citizens at-large, un-prepared to properly respond to the crises that are happening because of the virus.

As of February, 2021, the Pandemic has caused approximately two million human deaths and hundreds of millions of infected people who are suffering from long-term health effects.

Because many societal institution’s leaders and their members were not prepared for such crises, many socio-economic and ecological crises are being experienced.

The lecturer will focus upon these questions:

  1. What can we learn from previous pandemics and how can those lessons help us to recover from COVID-19?
  2. What can be done to make socio-economic systems that are more flexible and resilient to anticipate and to respond to such crises?
  3. What can be learned to help us make education and training more effective during and after the pandemic?
  4. What can be learned about alternative ways of doing research?
  5. What can we learn that will help us reduce the probability and severity of future pandemics?
  6. What will PRES’21’s participants do when they return home with regard to the foregoing questions?

Short Bio of the Lecturer

Donald Huisingh obtained his BS in Science Specialization from the Univ. of Minnesota in 1961, and his Ph. D from the Univ. of Wisconsin in 1965 in Plant Pathology. He taught Plant Pathology in North Carolina State University from 1965 to 1983. Since then he worked in universities in 50 countries.

He founded the Journal of Cleaner Production (JCLP) in 1992 and was the Editor-in-Chief until December, 31, 2015. The JCLP has an IF = 7.246

He was the Co-Founder of the “Erasmus Off-Campus Ph.D. Programme on Cleaner Production in 1995.

Dr. Huisingh is skilled in interdisciplinary education and holistic approaches to defining and solving society's problems so that effective and equitable progress can be made in transitioning to Sustainable Societies. He is the author or co-author of more than 300 articles & book chapters.

Qiuwang Wang

Name and Title

Qiuwang Wang,
Professor

Affiliation

School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University

Lecture Title

Heat transfer optimation based on a new space thermal resistance network method

Lecture Abstract

Convective thermal resistance along the transverse and streamwise directions may vary significantly in high-temperature fluids and supercritical fluids. However, these variations are usually ignored, and thus the one-dimentional thermal resistance network and uniform heat transfer enhancement elements are used.

In this talk, a new space thermal resistance network is proposed. The variations of convective heat resistance along the transverse and streamwise directions could be considered, and quicker and more accurate prediction for heat transfer in the high-temperature fluids or supercritical fluids can be obtained. A new optimization method based on optimal thermal resistance ratio is then proposed for heat transfer enhancement.

At last, two examples are given to introduce how to use the new optimization method to enhance the heat transfer performance in a double-fluid heat exchanger and a single-fluid heat sink.

The results show that the comprehensive heat transfer performance of the optimized non-uniform heat transfer enhancement elements by using this new optimization method is significantly improved compared with the traditional thermal design method.

Short Bio of the Lecturer

His research interests include heat transfer enhancement and its applications to engineering problems, high-temperature heat transfer, transport phenomena in porous media, numerical simulation, prediction & optimization.

He is a Fellow of ASME, a China Delegate of Assembly for International Heat Transfer Conferences, a member of Scientific Council of the International Centre for Heat and Mass Transfer, a vice president of Chinese Society of Engineering Thermophysics in Heat and Mass Transfer.

He is an Associate Editor of Heat Transfer Engineering, and Editorial Board Member for Energy Conversion and Management, Applied Thermal Engineering, Energy, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, etc.

He is the Initiator and Chairman of International Workshop on Heat Transfer Advances for Energy Conservation and Pollution Control since 2011. He has delivered more than 40 Plenary/Keynote lectures in international conferences or foreign Universities.

He has been author or co-author of more than 200 international journal papers.

Pen-Chi Chiang

Name and Title

Pen-Chi Chiang,
Distinguished Professor

Affiliation

Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University

Lecture Title

Implementing Green Chemistry Principles for Circular Economy Towards Sustainable Development Goals

Lecture Abstract

Green Chemistry is the molecular science of sustainability to design chemical products/processes that reduce the use/generation of hazardous substances, thereby enhancing energy efficiency, building green supply chains, and creating business opportunities.

It is required to establish national governance framework for a new waste management policy including sustainable production and consumption, resource efficiency maximization and environmental impact minimization at every stage of the product and service lifecycle for circular economy.

On the other hand, the chemical industry should promote efforts to manage materials and products on a life-cycle basis and adopt the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) policy for multi-scale analysis system in the petrochemical industry and establish interdisciplinary communication platform for policy prospective and implement professionalism integrity teamwork innovation for “Cooperate Culture”.

The academia should build intelligent recycling system based on smart device, IOT, big data and intelligent sanitation system strengthening the energy and resource sustainability. Finally, the chemical industry would promote SDGs by establishing circular economy business model based on RESOLVE (Regenerate, Share, Optimize, Loop, Virtualise, Exchange).

Short Bio of the Lecturer

Dr. Chiang is a distinguished professor of Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, a Fellow of Water Environment Federation (WEF) and a Diplomat of the American Academy of Water Resources Engineers of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

Dr. Chiang is known for his work in carbon adsorption, membrane and ozonation processes, carbon capture technology, green chemistry principles for circular economy and sustainability for energy and industrial development.

Stratos Pistikopoulos

Name and Title

Professor Stratos Pistikopoulos,
PhD FIChemE FAIChE FREng

Affiliation

Director, Texas A&M Energy Institute, Dow Chemical Chair, Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University

Lecture Title

Towards a Circular Economy Systems Engineering Framework

Short Bio of the Lecturer

Professor Pistikopoulos is the Director of the Texas A&M Energy Institute and holds the Dow Chemical Chair in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University. He was a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Imperial College London, UK (1991-2015) and the Director of its Centre for Process Systems Engineering (2002-2009).

He holds a Ph.D. degree from Carnegie Mellon University and he worked with Shell Chemicals in Amsterdam before joining Imperial. He has authored/co-authored over 500 major research publications in the areas of modelling, control and optimization of process, energy and systems engineering applications, 15 books and 4 patents.

He is a co-founder of Process Systems Enterprise (PSE) Ltd, a Fellow of AIChE and IChemE and the current Editor-in-Chief of Computers & Chemical Engineering. In 2007, Prof. Pistikopoulos was a co-recipient of the prestigious MacRobert Award from the Royal Academy of Engineering; in 2012, he was the recipient of the Computing in Chemical Engineering Award of CAST/AIChE; and in 2020, he received the Sargent Medal from IChemE. He received the title of Doctor Honoris Causa from the University Politehnica of Bucharest in 2014, and from the University of Pannonia in 2015. In 2013, he was elected Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in the UK.